despicable_me

50 Best kids movies ever…

So here is my totally unofficial, unscientific, just for fun list of our family’s top 50 films for children.

50. Prince Caspian

49. Shrek 4

48. Old Yeller

47. Short Circuit

46. Sinbad- legend of the 7 seas

45. Beauty and the Beast

44. Surfs Up

43.ET

42. Mary Poppins

41. How to Train Your Dragon

40. Sound of Music

39. The Rescuers

38. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

37. Wallace and Grommet and the case of the Ware Rabbit

36 George of the Jungle

35. Hoodwinked

34. Chicken Run

33. A Bugs Life

32 Wizard of Oz

31. Iron Giant

30. Home Alone

29. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

28. Matilda

27. Aladin

26. Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone

25. Joseph and the Technicolour Dreamcoat

24. Ice Age

23. Wall E

22. Madagascar

21. Kung Fu Panda

20. Prince of Egypt

19. Monsters Inc

18.Peter Pan

17. Shrek

16. Time Bandits

15. Despicable Me

14. Voyage of the Dawn Treader

13. Dumbo

12. Jungle Book

11. Horton Hears a Hoo

10. The Incredibles

9. Karate Kid

8. Up

7. Princess Bride

6. Lion the Witch and the Wadrobe

5. Lion King

4. Toy Story 3

3. Toy Story

2. Finding Nemo

1. Toy Story 2

 

15 thoughts on “50 Best kids movies ever…”

  1. My top ten
    10. Up
    9. Cars
    8. Happy Feet
    7. The Incredibles
    6. Finding Nemo
    5. Monsters Inc
    4. Ratatouille
    3. How to Train your Dragon
    2. Toy Story
    1. Madagascar

    Have watched all of these multiple times, Pixar films in particular are AMAZING!!

    1. good call on how to train your dragon – loved that movie – forgot to put it in – hmmm will have to rethink – maybe madagascar 2 gets bumped off the list

  2. I wouldn’t consider myself an expert on children’s films – that’s a genre that will be revisited in the coming years for us. However, I’m surprised Shrek 3 makes it into the list – I found that the most disappointing of the Shrek trilogy. It’s fairly old school, but The Sound of Music surely should be there as a children’s classic, though you rescued your classics with the like of Old Yeller.
    I’ve not seen the Joseph film you include – is it better than Prince of Egypt?
    Personally, I think more Disney could have gone in there, and Wallace & Grommit, but that’s where personal preference comes in.
    What do your kids have as their top 10?

  3. I’d have to add Watership Down, The Railway Children and Honey I Shrunk the Kids to your list. Also I’m wondering how you would define a kids film as opposed to a film that is suitable for kids to watch or a family film for example? Many of the films on your list aren’t just for kids, particularly the many Pixar films. I’d also question Time Bandits as being a kids film even though it has a child protagonist. Also it could be argued that things like the original Star Wars films, all rate ‘U’, and accompanied by a raft of merchandising, are also kids films.

  4. An interesting list – although very much dominated by modern American animation. And this is where I start to get geeky…

    The obvious omission is clearly any work by Hayao Miyazaki (in fact, Studio Ghibli doesn’t seem to get a look in). My Neighbour Totoro is regarded by many (including Pixar boss John Lassiter and animation legend Terry Gilliam) as the greatest animated film ever – something I’d be inclined to agree with. At the very least, his latest film, Ponyo – a homage to The Little Mermaid – should have made the grade.

    Sticking to the more recent, mainstream films, you’ve not included any of the major blockbusters such as Back to the Future or Raiders of the Lost Ark, let alone Star Wars: A New Hope (the less said about the prequels, however, the better…). Even Who Framed Roger Rabbit is probably worthy of a children’s list.

    Going slightly further back, and plugging into our own childhood, Dougal and the Blue Cat (far superior to the CG Magic Roundabout film of recent years) is certainly worth a look.

    I’m intrigued that there are no films from the early days of Hollywood. Charlie Chaplin could easily be a contender – take your pick from Modern Times, the Gold Rush, the Circus or, probably the most obvious one for children, the Kid. Buster Keaton’s Sherlock Jr is another classic showcasing probably the greatest comedian of the last 100 years. Or, if you feel these may be a little “highbrow”, why not go for Harold Lloyd’s Safety Last?

    Moving into the sound age, but sticking with physical comedy, Laurel and Hardy are still able to raise many a laugh in young and old. My choice would be Way Out West but there are more than enough to go for (Sons of the Desert and Our Relations would be a couple of others to consider).

    There are also no classic swashbucklers to get the excitement pumping. Yes, there’s The Princess Bride (although chances are some of the jokes will go over the heads of little ones) but what about the greats from the early days of the silver screen? The Thief of Bagdad may be a little too far back (although it paved the way for all the action movies since) but Errol Flynn in The Adventures of Robin Hood is certainly more than adequate. And, depending on how young the kids are, the original King Kong with Queen of Scream Faye Wray (rather than the disasterous 1970s remake or Peter Jackson’s bloated attempt) is a thriller from start to finish (I suspect the Japanese Godzilla films may be a little too much for young tastes – not least because of the subtitles – but when they get older, definitely worth showing them one of these too).

    Of course, unless your kids are bilingual, there’s no point looking abroad too much. However, relatively silent films such as The Red Balloon and Tati’s brilliant Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday shouldn’t cause them any trouble.

    Well, those are just a few thoughts. I’ve left off anything too scary (Coraline is a modern classic but, depending on the age and disposition of your kids, may leave them with nightmares). At the very least, it may introduce a few films that you’ve not seen yet either.

    Oh, and interesting that you went for the Lion King rather than Kimba the White Lion, the 1960s Japanese series which Disney allegedly plagarised for their own film. But I digress… ;-)

    1. We have both Totoro and Ponyo, as well as Howl’s Moving Castle (amazing), Spirited Away (amazing), and Kiki’s Delivery Service (great). We bought “Castle in the Sky” and promptly took it back because of the machine gun violence (2 year old). Anyways, just wanted to say that your extend-a-mix comment made my day and is a shining example of why I keep a long attention span. I love getting through all the crap to find that one piece of art that makes it all worth it, in this case a comment.

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